Fun Facts

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Check out these fun facts about women, engineers, and cool engineering achievements.

  • Samantha Morris Posted on December 13, 2012 by Samantha Morris
    Remote Presence
    Robots are increasingly being used in hospitals to allow critical care physicians to be in two places at once.
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    Resource Added: December 13, 2012

    Latest Update: July 29, 2014

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on September 5, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Bobsleigh Runs
    There are less than 20 bobsleigh tracks in the entire world approved by the sport's international governing organization. The 2002 Olympic track in Park City, Utah, is the southernmost track in the world and is designed for bobsleigh, luge and skeleton events. The $25 million bobsleigh track of Park City, Utah is the most challenging sports track of its time.
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    Resource Added: September 5, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on May 11, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Crystal Bridge
    In Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the Crystal Bridge Conservatory is the focus of the Myriad Botanical Gardens. Engineers designed a cloud-making system to provide the necessary environment for a rainforest. A path next to a 35-foot waterfall leads up a "mountain" of rock formations, which are really latex molds from actual rock outcroppings. The conservatory is made from over 3,000 acrylic panels. It is seven stories tall and 224 feet long.
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    Resource Added: May 11, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Mormon Tabernacle
    The Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City, Utah is an amazing engineering and acoustic accomplishment. The Mormon Tabernacle's unique shape is so acoustically sensitive that a pin dropped in the pulpit can be clearly heard at the back of the hall - 170 feet away! The 150-foot-wide domed roof was created by using steam to bend the wood planks, which were then lashed together with rawhide thongs and wooden pegs.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    On the Road...
    There are enough roads in the U.S. to stretch from the earth to the moon 8 times! The U.S. interstate system has a total length of over 46,000 miles, but that is only a small fraction of the total number of roads in the country. Transportation engineers have helped to build almost 4 million miles of road in the United States. That's enough to stretch from the earth to the moon 8 times. And the concrete used to construct the Interstate System alone could build a wall nine feet thick and 50 feet high around the world’s equator.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Presidential Engineers
    Herbert Hoover and Jimmy Carter, both U.S. Presidents, had engineering backgrounds. Herbert Hoover, the United States 31st President, studied mining engineering at Stanford University, graduating in 1895. Jimmy Carter, the 39th U.S. President , attended Georgia Tech and the United States Naval Academy, from which he graduated in 1946. Carter served in the Navy for 10 years as an engineer working with nuclear-powered submarines.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Snowboards for Women
    Engineers, scientists, and athletes work together to improve snowboarding equipment. Although women have participated in snow sports for a long time, they didn't always have as many choices as men when it came to selecting their gear. But as more women take up snowboarding, they have demanded better equipment, and snowboard manufactures have taken on the challenge to provide better gear based upon the proportions of a woman's body. Because men and women are built differently, their requirements for boots, boards, and skis are different. Women, for example, generally somewhat shorter and have smaller feet than men. So to give women better control over their snowboard, engineers have designed women's snowboards that are a bit shorter with a flex pattern designed to fit a woman's proportions. Women's boards are also generally narrower in the middle than men's boards to allow quick transfer of energy to the edges.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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