Sports & Entertainment

Engineers not only turn ideas into reality, they help turn reality into fantasy.

Engineering plays an important role in the creation of movies, televisions shows, video games, and amusement parks. Engineers from many different fields make their living in the entertainment industry doing a wide variety of things: computer programming for games or special effects, building sets for specials shot or stunts, developing toys, designing and constructing rides - list of possible jobs goes on and on.

Engineers are also helping athletes to play and compete with better equipment, cutting-edge training tools, and even clothing designed to help the body improve its performance.

When you hike, surf, play ball, go to the movies, play video games, watch TV - whatever you do for fun - chances are you’re using or watching something that an engineer helped to create.

  • Jennifer Polivka
    Test Engineer
    Nike
    Portland, OR, United States
  • Debbie Sterling
    CEO
    GoldieBlox, Inc.
    San Francisco, CA
  • Kate Gramling Posted on October 18, 2012 by Kate Gramling
    Skydiving from the Edge of Space
    It takes a team to make a record-breaking sky dive from the edge of space like Felix Baumgartner did on October 14. It takes engineers.
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    Resource Added: October 18, 2012

    Latest Update: October 18, 2012

  • Egirl   Team Posted on September 7, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Wearable Technology
    While engineering and fashion may not appear to go together at first glance, there are few fields in the world where engineers are not making a contribution, and fashion is no exception. In fact, recent advances mean that the contribution of engineers to the fashion industry may be even more important in the coming years.
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    Resource Added: September 7, 2012

    Latest Update: October 13, 2012

  • Egirl   Team Posted on September 6, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Science Of The Summer Olympics: Engineering In Sports
    "Science of the Summer Olympics: Engineering In Sports,” the fourth and latest installment in the “Science of Sports” franchise, explores the science, engineering and technology that are helping athletes maximize their performance at the 2012 London Games. How does swimmer Missy Franklin use the principles of fluid dynamics to move more quickly through water? What are the unique biomechanics that have helped make sprinter Usain Bolt the world’s fastest human? What does weightlifter Sarah Robles have in common with a high-tech robot? How do engineers build faster pools, stronger safety helmets, and specialized wheelchairs for disabled athletes? Explore these and many other engineering and technology concepts in this FREE 10-part educational video series.
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    Resource Added: September 6, 2012

    Latest Update: October 15, 2012

  • Helen Augusta Blanchard
    One of the greatest inventors of the industrial era.
    Blanchard Overseaming Company
  • Egirl   Team Posted on September 5, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Bobsleigh Runs
    There are less than 20 bobsleigh tracks in the entire world approved by the sport's international governing organization. The 2002 Olympic track in Park City, Utah, is the southernmost track in the world and is designed for bobsleigh, luge and skeleton events. The $25 million bobsleigh track of Park City, Utah is the most challenging sports track of its time.
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    Resource Added: September 5, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

  • Egirl   Team Posted on May 11, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Ferris Wheel
    Did you know the Ferris Wheel is considered an engineering wonder? The Ferris Wheel was designed by George W. Ferris in 1893. It was designed to be the landmark of the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893. The wheel is supported by two 140-foot steel towers. The towers are connected by a 45-foot axle, making the axle the largest single piece of forged steel made at that time.
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    Resource Added: May 11, 2012

    Latest Update: September 21, 2012

  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Snowboards for Women
    Engineers, scientists, and athletes work together to improve snowboarding equipment. Although women have participated in snow sports for a long time, they didn't always have as many choices as men when it came to selecting their gear. But as more women take up snowboarding, they have demanded better equipment, and snowboard manufactures have taken on the challenge to provide better gear based upon the proportions of a woman's body. Because men and women are built differently, their requirements for boots, boards, and skis are different. Women, for example, generally somewhat shorter and have smaller feet than men. So to give women better control over their snowboard, engineers have designed women's snowboards that are a bit shorter with a flex pattern designed to fit a woman's proportions. Women's boards are also generally narrower in the middle than men's boards to allow quick transfer of energy to the edges.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Speed Skating
    A single innovation in skate design caused the world speed skating records in all the categories to be broken in the 1998 Olympics.
    One of the most controversial changes in the recent history of speed skating involves use of clapskates, also known as slapskates. The blade on clapskates is attached by a hinge to the front of the boot. As a result, the blade will detach from the heel of the boot as the skater pushes with her calf muscles through the end of a stroke. Used by skaters in long track races, clapskates allow skaters to keep their blades on the ice slightly longer than with traditional skates, giving them more power and speed. While clapskates had been around for over a hundred years, it wasn't until inventors and engineers started working with biomechanics researchers that the technology was really developed for professional skaters.  After 1996 when the Dutch women's skaters demonstrated how effective the skates could be, it wasn't long before all serious ...
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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